Copyright 2017 National Homecare Council (trading as Integrated Care Council)
But when we started working as home carers for a research project at the University of Nottingham, this negative portrayal didn’t resonate with the standard of care we saw provided. Yes, we saw some of the same problems, like the effect of zero hour contracts and lack of payment for travel time, but we also found positive and encouraging examples of care. The research project was about understanding what ‘good’ home care looks like. It involved working for 11 months with a reputable home care provider, where we completed the usual training. Some of the visits we undertook were to help clients get up and ready for the day, others were for companionship and involved chatting or taking clients out to local cafes and shops. We got to know our clients and their relatives and enjoyed spending time with them. ‘Above and beyond’ In the social care sector, it’s common for home care visits to last as little as 15 minutes. The organisation we worked for offered a minimum of one hour, but we still frequently found it very difficult to leave on time and would often spend extra time with our clients when we felt it was unsafe or unkind to leave them at the end of the hour. We wanted to make sure clients were safely washed and dressed before we left them, but they weren’t always ready to do this and perhaps wanted to enjoy their breakfast and a chat first (who can blame them). Because we were working with people with dementia, it was also often impossible to explain in any meaningful way why leaving on time was an issue, and so it felt unkind to try to do this. Other carers we worked with said they regularly spent unpaid time with clients and were not paid for the time travelling between visits. The number of hours they received each week was also unpredictable and understandably this caused some to worry about their finances. We were thankfully paid by the university so this didn’t affect us, but the long hours were a challenge and meant we often skipped meals and missed out on time with family and friends. Despite these issues, we still saw staff going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty. We witnessed care workers bringing dolls and pets to visits for clients to interact with. Others used their own money to purchase treats for clients (such as scones and strawberries), and referred to clients as a member of the family. Most carers also demonstrated a high level of skill and sensitivity in communicating with clients, especially those with dementia. Some also told us how they take their work home with them – as clients occupy their worries and thoughts outside of ‘usual working hours’. Of course, this may be a reflection of the recruitment and training standards in the company we worked for, we know it’s not the case everywhere. ‘Reciprocal relationships’ One key thing we found, and other care workers told us, was that care visits are particularly rewarding when there are signs of a reciprocal relationship between care worker and client. For example, when clients show their appreciation and signs of their personalities, which may otherwise be concealed by their symptoms of dementia. Some of the most enjoyable visits were those where clients remembered things about us, like where we’d been on holiday, and shared stories of their own experiences, as this enabled a more reciprocal conversation. We are now interested in finding out more about how care workers may find value or reward in care visits when the client is uncommunicative, or cannot articulate their thanks. Our time with the company taught us that care work is a very diverse and highly-skilled job, and it deserves both better recognition and higher pay. Samantha Wilkinson and Lucy Perry-Young worked as home carers as part of the BOUGH study (Broadening Our Understanding of Good Home Care for people with dementia), which is funded by the NIHR School for Social Care Research (SCCR).
The poor quality of home care services is never far from the headlines these  days. Recent documentaries, such as the Channel 4 Dispatches ‘Britain’s Pensioner Care Scandal’, have highlighted the industry-wide problems of visits being cuts short, unfair terms and conditions for staff, and variable quality and regulation of services. It all makes for a worrying picture.
Jonathan Mace, Head of Live at Home Retirement Living at Methodist Homes Association writes about Live at Home schemes, dedicated to keeping people living healthily and happily in their own homes. Methodist Homes Association – Home Retirement Living: We want living in your own home in later life to be a positive experience where people remain independent and happily connected with their local community. Through charitable funding, we’ve been running Live at Home schemes for nearly 30 years – with our first scheme established in Lichfield in 1988. Each scheme is unique, tailored to its area and of course its members. What all schemes have in common though is their dedication to keeping people living healthily and happily in their own homes. Our Live at Home community based schemes work to make sure people don’t become isolated or lonely in their own home. These Live at Home services include befriending, exercise and fitness activities, trips out and lunch clubs – all intended to build communities and friendship, promote and foster independence, and help prevent isolation and loneliness. It’s an exciting time for MHA – in 2015 we published our 10-year strategy with a real focus on growing Live at Home. We set out to quadruple the number of older people we support, from 9,000 to 36,000 by 2025. We’re already well on the way to reaching our goal and today we support more than 10,000 individuals across Britain. As well as working to make our existing schemes more sustainable so that we can ensure the longevity of service provision, we’re busy raising funds to open many more. This year we are expecting to open at least 14 new schemes and significantly expand a further 11. All in all, this should see our membership grow to over 14,000 older people by the end of the year. Jonathan Mace Head of Live at Home Retirement Living MHA Tel: 07483 936958 Mobile: 07483 936958 http://www.mha.org.uk
CASCAIDr will provide free advice to any adult with a current legal problem, related to the Care Act – so if you’re struggling with assessment, eligibility or care planning / cuts issues, help may be at hand. Most people don’t even know that they’ve GOT a legal problem, until it’s too late. Others just don’t want to rock the boat – through fear or simple resignation. In difficult times, many people feel that other people’s relatives shouldn’t be someone else’s concern – even though none of us can ever predict whether it will be us who ends up needing adult social care. So we all need law, and legal principle. The proposed charity is going to be enforcing PUBLIC LAW rights – that is, people’s rights to assessment, and thereafter, to have their assessed eligible needs met, decently and sufficiently, by local councils. Budgetary difficulties are relevant to local authorities’ discretion as to how to meet needs, but not as to WHETHER to meet them. That could well come as a surprise to many people reading this…! Belinda’s been a barrister and a solicitor, as well as a trainer, writer and commentator in the field for over 20 years. But she’s now returning to her roots as a lawyer, to campaign – and intending to operate the service as a charity, attracting 25% in GiftAid from government towards the organisation’s costs. Seems fair, eh? We’ll also be getting money in from selling Membership Packages – for provider organisations, advocacy providers and lawfirms – the benefit being training materials, access to the old Care and Health Law database, an ongoing relationship with Belinda and other specialist advisers, and 3 hours of advice a year. The proposed charity can’t operate without donations – donations from the public – and donations from social care providers. So, priority no. 1 has to be turning people’s natural interest in any challenge to the status quo, into an active and passionate commitment to spreading the word – it’s not too late to save the idea of a social care safety net. Donations will be made via MyDonate.com – where it’s free to give, apart from the card company’s costs. So please start tweeting, using the hashtag #CASCAIDr, and following @BelindaSchwehr. You will be able to Like / Follow the charity on Facebook and LinkedIn as well, once the charity has been launched. Helping the proposed Charity - what else needs to be done? The service will need volunteers to talk to people who have a problem which they can’t quite get down on to paper on their own. The service will need help with advising. You’d need to be Care Act aware, at the very least, and have some grasp of how public law works in this country. That’s the law of judicial review, if you are interested in signing up. You don’t have to be insured, but you do have to be happy to be self-employed, because we are not employing staff. We also need help to stay up to date with what’s happening in the sector. So if a council or NHS body near you is doing something you can hardly believe, please let us know the details, via BelindaSchwehr@CASCAIDr.com Centre for Adults’ Social Care – Advice, Information and Dispute Resolution Tel 01252 725890 Mobile 07974 399361
MESSAGE FROM JAMES REILLY Chair of the Integrated Care Council
The Integrated Care Council – going forward Dear Colleagues, I have completed my first year as Chairman of the ICC and in my 33 years in the health and social care sector I cannot recall a period of such far reaching and intensive change providing great challenges for all of us.  As I write this we are less than two weeks from the general election. Never before have the issues confronting social care and all who depend on it been so prominent and pivotal in an election campaign. It is of course high time that our political leaders grasp the nettle that they have been ignoring for way too long.  The current focus on social care is laying bare for all to see the exacting toll upon service users and patients and their hard-pressed carers (both unpaid and paid) arising from the neglect and procrastination of successive governments. Many of us who have been here before in previous elections will be somewhat sceptical about the prospects of the government that will prevail in this election taking the necessary action to address this crisis in a sustainable way.  However, given the level of scrutiny their undertakings have received in this campaign, I do believe that the coming government will pay a heavy penalty if their actions do not match their pledges in regard to health and social care. In the past year we have witnessed the impact upon our care system of significantly increased and unprecedented levels of demand. One positive outcome from this is that leaders across the care system now fully accept that it will not thrive unless greater integrated care is delivered. It is now beyond question that only genuinely integrated care delivered closer to home will achieve the urgent step changes in managing more efficiently the flows of frail elderly patients into and out of hospitals. There are now higher levels of commitment from senior leaders in Councils and Health organisations to achieving this outcome than I have ever witnessed giving us all some hope of progress with Integrated Care.  ICC has not been sheltered from the storms battering our sector.  Although over the last twelve months we delivered a full programme of five conferences across the UK maintaining incredibly low delegate rates, we still experienced fall in attendance. Participants sited pressures of finance and challenges releasing staff given pressures on their time. In addition, earlier this year our long term and main sponsor CM2000 announced they would be ending their relationship with us as they refocussed their investment.  I want to thank all at CM2000 for their support over the years and hope that they will still exhibit at our future events. Please direct us to any organisations seeking to engage with our sector who might seek to be future sponsors of ICC. Not withstanding these challenges, careful stewardship of our resources means that we are still able to mount excellent conferences and I hope to see many of you at our forthcoming events in London and Edinburgh (more details of these to be found in this newsletter).  You will also see more on our substantially enhanced Website delivering the capacity to improve our offer to you our members. As ever, I must thank all the members of ICC executive for their continuing support and Mary Humphrey, our in dominatable Business Manager, for her unswerving efforts to progress the work of ICC. My thanks and best wishes to all our new and loyal members. James A. Reilly Chairman, Integrated Care Council.
Executive Summary: This Scotland’s third National Dementia Strategy. It builds on progress over the last ten years in transforming services and improving outcomes for people with dementia and their carers. The first strategy was published in 2010 and focused on improving the quality of dementia services through more timely diagnosis and on better care and treatment. The second focused on improving post diagnosis support and strengthening integrated and person centred support. While there has been considerable progress in improving care and support for people, we know there is more to do. The shared vision is of a Scotland where people with dementia and those who care for them have access to timely, skilled and well co- ordinated support from diagnosis to end of life, which helps achieve the outcomes that matter to them. Over the last ten years there has been progress around improving diagnosis rates, post-diagnostic support, workforce development and in improving the experience of people with dementia and that of their families and carers in hospital and other settings. However, we know there is more to do. With a continued focus on improving the quality of care, this strategy sets out 21 commitments around work in diagnosis, including post-diagnostic support, care co-ordination, end of life and palliative care, workforce development and capability, data and information and research.. At the heart of this strategy is recognition of the need to ensure a person centred and flexible approach to providing at all stages of the care journey. Contact is: Darren Tierney – darren.tierney@gov.scot
Scotland’s National Dementia Strategy 2017 - 2020: Scotland’s National Dementia Strategy 2017 to 2020, was issued on Wednesday 28 June 2017. This is Scotland’s third national dementia strategy. It builds on progress over the last ten years in transforming services and improving outcomes for people with dementia, their families and carers. Setting out 21 new commitments, the strategy provides a framework for further action to ensure the realisation of our shared vision for people with dementia and their carers.
Belinda Schwehr, of Care and Health Law, will be launching a new charity for free legal advice, in 2017. It’s called CASCAIDr – and this is its first call to action!
NEWS ARCHIVE
Jonathan Mace, Head of Live at Home Retirement Living at Methodist Homes Association writes about Live at Home schemes, dedicated to keeping people living healthily and happily in their own homes. Methodist Homes Association – Home Retirement Living: We want living in your own home in later life to be a positive experience where people remain independent and happily connected with their local community. Through charitable funding, we’ve been running Live at Home schemes for nearly 30 years – with our first scheme established in Lichfield in 1988. Each scheme is unique, tailored to its area and of course its members. What all schemes have in common though is their dedication to keeping people living healthily and happily in their own homes. Our Live at Home community based schemes work to make sure people don’t become isolated or lonely in their own home. These Live at Home services include befriending, exercise and fitness activities, trips out and lunch clubs – all intended to build communities and friendship, promote and foster independence, and help prevent isolation and loneliness. It’s an exciting time for MHA – in 2015 we published our 10-year strategy with a real focus on growing Live at Home. We set out to quadruple the number of older people we support, from 9,000 to 36,000 by 2025. We’re already well on the way to reaching our goal and today we support more than 10,000 individuals across Britain. As well as working to make our existing schemes more sustainable so that we can ensure the longevity of service provision, we’re busy raising funds to open many more. This year we are expecting to open at least 14 new schemes and significantly expand a further 11. All in all, this should see our membership grow to over 14,000 older people by the end of the year. Jonathan Mace Head of Live at Home Retirement Living MHA Tel: 07483 936958 Mobile: 07483 936958 http://www.mha.org.uk
Copyright 2017 National Homecare Council (trading as Integrated Care Council)
The poor quality of home care services is never far from the headlines these  days. Recent documentaries, such as the Channel 4 Dispatches ‘Britain’s Pensioner Care Scandal’, have highlighted the industry-wide problems of visits being cuts short, unfair terms and conditions for staff, and variable quality and regulation of services. It all makes for a worrying picture. But when we started working as home carers for a research project at the University of Nottingham, this negative portrayal didn’t resonate with the standard of care we saw provided. Yes, we saw some of the same problems, like the effect of zero hour contracts and lack of payment for travel time, but we also found positive and encouraging examples of care. The research project was about understanding what ‘good’ home care looks like. It involved working for 11 months with a reputable home care provider, where we completed the usual training. Some of the visits we undertook were to help clients get up and ready for the day, others were for companionship and involved chatting or taking clients out to local cafes and shops. We got to know our clients and their relatives and enjoyed spending time with them. ‘Above and beyond’ In the social care sector, it’s common for home care visits to last as little as 15 minutes. The organisation we worked for offered a minimum of one hour, but we still frequently found it very difficult to leave on time and would often spend extra time with our clients when we felt it was unsafe or unkind to leave them at the end of the hour. We wanted to make sure clients were safely washed and dressed before we left them, but they weren’t always ready to do this and perhaps wanted to enjoy their breakfast and a chat first (who can blame them). Because we were working with people with dementia, it was also often impossible to explain in any meaningful way why leaving on time was an issue, and so it felt unkind to try to do this. Other carers we worked with said they regularly spent unpaid time with clients and were not paid for the time travelling between visits. The number of hours they received each week was also unpredictable and understandably this caused some to worry about their finances. We were thankfully paid by the university so this didn’t affect us, but the long hours were a challenge and meant we often skipped meals and missed out on time with family and friends. Despite these issues, we still saw staff going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty. We witnessed care workers bringing dolls and pets to visits for clients to interact with. Others used their own money to purchase treats for clients (such as scones and strawberries), and referred to clients as a member of the family. Most carers also demonstrated a high level of skill and sensitivity in communicating with clients, especially those with dementia. Some also told us how they take their work home with them – as clients occupy their worries and thoughts outside of ‘usual working hours’. Of course, this may be a reflection of the recruitment and training standards in the company we worked for, we know it’s not the case everywhere. ‘Reciprocal relationships’ One key thing we found, and other care workers told us, was that care visits are particularly rewarding when there are signs of a reciprocal relationship between care worker and client. For example, when clients show their appreciation and signs of their personalities, which may otherwise be concealed by their symptoms of dementia. Some of the most enjoyable visits were those where clients remembered things about us, like where we’d been on holiday, and shared stories of their own experiences, as this enabled a more reciprocal conversation. We are now interested in finding out more about how care workers may find value or reward in care visits when the client is uncommunicative, or cannot articulate their thanks. Our time with the company taught us that care work is a very diverse and highly-skilled job, and it deserves both better recognition and higher pay. Samantha Wilkinson and Lucy Perry-Young worked as home carers as part of the BOUGH study (Broadening Our Understanding of Good Home Care for people with dementia), which is funded by the NIHR School for Social Care Research (SCCR).
CASCAIDr will provide free advice to any adult with a current legal problem, related to the Care Act – so if you’re struggling with assessment, eligibility or care planning / cuts issues, help may be at hand. Most people don’t even know that they’ve GOT a legal problem, until it’s too late. Others just don’t want to rock the boat – through fear or simple resignation. In difficult times, many people feel that other people’s relatives shouldn’t be someone else’s concern – even though none of us can ever predict whether it will be us who ends up needing adult social care. So we all need law, and legal principle. The proposed charity is going to be enforcing PUBLIC LAW rights – that is, people’s rights to assessment, and thereafter, to have their assessed eligible needs met, decently and sufficiently, by local councils. Budgetary difficulties are relevant to local authorities’ discretion as to how to meet needs, but not as to WHETHER to meet them. That could well come as a surprise to many people reading this…! Belinda’s been a barrister and a solicitor, as well as a trainer, writer and commentator in the field for over 20 years. But she’s now returning to her roots as a lawyer, to campaign – and intending to operate the service as a charity, attracting 25% in GiftAid from government towards the organisation’s costs. Seems fair, eh? We’ll also be getting money in from selling Membership Packages – for provider organisations, advocacy providers and lawfirms – the benefit being training materials, access to the old Care and Health Law database, an ongoing relationship with Belinda and other specialist advisers, and 3 hours of advice a year. The proposed charity can’t operate without donations – donations from the public – and donations from social care providers. So, priority no. 1 has to be turning people’s natural interest in any challenge to the status quo, into an active and passionate commitment to spreading the word – it’s not too late to save the idea of a social care safety net. Donations will be made via MyDonate.com – where it’s free to give, apart from the card company’s costs. So please start tweeting, using the hashtag #CASCAIDr, and following @BelindaSchwehr. You will be able to Like / Follow the charity on Facebook and LinkedIn as well, once the charity has been launched. Helping the proposed Charity - what else needs to be done? The service will need volunteers to talk to people who have a problem which they can’t quite get down on to paper on their own. The service will need help with advising. You’d need to be Care Act aware, at the very least, and have some grasp of how public law works in this country. That’s the law of judicial review, if you are interested in signing up. You don’t have to be insured, but you do have to be happy to be self-employed, because we are not employing staff. We also need help to stay up to date with what’s happening in the sector. So if a council or NHS body near you is doing something you can hardly believe, please let us know the details, via BelindaSchwehr@CASCAIDr.com Centre for Adults’ Social Care – Advice, Information and Dispute Resolution Tel 01252 725890 Mobile 07974 399361
Belinda Schwehr, of Care and Health Law, will be launching a new charity for free legal advice, in 2017. It’s called CASCAIDr – and this is its first call to action!
MESSAGE FROM JAMES REILLY Chair of the Integrated Care Council
The Integrated Care Council – going forward Dear Colleagues, I have completed my first year as Chairman of the ICC and in my 33 years in the health and social care sector I cannot recall a period of such far reaching and intensive change providing great challenges for all of us.  As I write this we are less than two weeks from the general election. Never before have the issues confronting social care and all who depend on it been so prominent and pivotal in an election campaign. It is of course high time that our political leaders grasp the nettle that they have been ignoring for way too long.  The current focus on social care is laying bare for all to see the exacting toll upon service users and patients and their hard-pressed carers (both unpaid and paid) arising from the neglect and procrastination of successive governments. Many of us who have been here before in previous elections will be somewhat sceptical about the prospects of the government that will prevail in this election taking the necessary action to address this crisis in a sustainable way.  However, given the level of scrutiny their undertakings have received in this campaign, I do believe that the coming government will pay a heavy penalty if their actions do not match their pledges in regard to health and social care. In the past year we have witnessed the impact upon our care system of significantly increased and unprecedented levels of demand. One positive outcome from this is that leaders across the care system now fully accept that it will not thrive unless greater integrated care is delivered. It is now beyond question that only genuinely integrated care delivered closer to home will achieve the urgent step changes in managing more efficiently the flows of frail elderly patients into and out of hospitals. There are now higher levels of commitment from senior leaders in Councils and Health organisations to achieving this outcome than I have ever witnessed giving us all some hope of progress with Integrated Care.  ICC has not been sheltered from the storms battering our sector.  Although over the last twelve months we delivered a full programme of five conferences across the UK maintaining incredibly low delegate rates, we still experienced fall in attendance. Participants sited pressures of finance and challenges releasing staff given pressures on their time. In addition, earlier this year our long term and main sponsor CM2000 announced they would be ending their relationship with us as they refocussed their investment.  I want to thank all at CM2000 for their support over the years and hope that they will still exhibit at our future events. Please direct us to any organisations seeking to engage with our sector who might seek to be future sponsors of ICC. Not withstanding these challenges, careful stewardship of our resources means that we are still able to mount excellent conferences and I hope to see many of you at our forthcoming events in London and Edinburgh (more details of these to be found in this newsletter).  You will also see more on our substantially enhanced Website delivering the capacity to improve our offer to you our members. As ever, I must thank all the members of ICC executive for their continuing support and Mary Humphrey, our in dominatable Business Manager, for her unswerving efforts to progress the work of ICC. My thanks and best wishes to all our new and loyal members. James A. Reilly Chairman, Integrated Care Council.
NEWS ARCHIVE